All Photos above: Eric Zee

All Photos above: Eric Zee


 

The Agreement

In 2011, Tomáš Libertíny was approached by Di Robson to take part in the cultural festival during London Olympics 2012. Along with other artists, Katie Patterson and Graeme Miller, Tomáš Libertiny was commisioned by the Royal Borough of Kensigton and Chelsea to create a public living art work. Studio Libertiny teamed up with Peter James from the Physics Chelsea Garden and Rudolf Moravčík from The Beekeeping Museum in Slovakia.

Studio Libertiny designed an organic tower-like structure on which the bees were invited to build their home (wax honeycombs). The skeleton was carefully engineered to accommodate for tensions and stability as well as minimal obstruction for building of cells. The title of the work insinuates the fragile relationship between nature and technology / one can not force nature only invite her when the conditions are set right hence the mutual agreement.

The structure was build and inhabited by a colony of bees who were free to fly in and out of the glasshouse.


Year: 2012
Location: Exhibition Road, South Kensington
Event: The Exhibition Road Show / collateral event to London Olympics 2012

Collaborators:
Studio Kees / 3D modelling and structure design
Culture Crew / custom design of AC unit
Keri Elmsly / project production and coordination
Peter James and Rudolf Moravčík / beekeepers
Studio Libertiny team: Lenka & Katka Dobránska, Kars Rotteveel

Text and Essay about the work by PhD. Lukáš Jenik is HERE.


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Analysis of the surface of the form

Analysis of the surface of the form

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  The complete installation visual of the "before and after" the building .

 

The complete installation visual of the "before and after" the building .

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Detail of the final installation with a metal grill to hide and  collect dying bees (in this time of the year, it is expected that natural death occurs in hundreds up to a thousand each day in a healthy hive). 

Detail of the final installation with a metal grill to hide and  collect dying bees (in this time of the year, it is expected that natural death occurs in hundreds up to a thousand each day in a healthy hive).